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Optical coherence tomography measurements of the fresh porcine eye and response of the outer coats of the eye to volume increase

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Asejczyk-Widlicka, Magdelena, Schachar, Ronald A. and Pierscionek, Barbara K. (2008) Optical coherence tomography measurements of the fresh porcine eye and response of the outer coats of the eye to volume increase. JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL OPTICS, 13 (2). 024002. [Journal article]

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DOI: 10.1117/1.2907453

Abstract

Corneal and scleral thickness and anterior chamber dimensions are required for understanding developmental and pathological processes. Parameters of the eyeball are also required to calculate optical and material properties. As the eyeball resembles a pressure vessel, it has been suggested that elasticity of the cornea and sclera could be calculated from the measurements of thickness. Baseline corneal and scleral thicknesses and anterior chamber dimensions and how these change with incremental increases of intraocular fluid are measured in fresh porcine eyes using the Visante OCT (optical coherence tomography). At baseline, corneal thickness is almost constant. Anterior scleral thickness is variable, decreasing from 0.91 +/- 0.07 mm near the limbus to a minimum of 0.58 +/- 0.13. Posterior scleral thickness is more constant with an average of 0.78 +/- 0.09 mm. Near the optic nerve the thickness increases to 1.00 +/- 0.09 mm. Average baseline anterior chamber angle, diameter, and depth were found to be 33.15 +/- 4.91 deg, 13.60 +/- 0.38 mm, and 2.13 +/- 0.22 mm, respectively. After fluid injections, maximum changes in corneal and scleral thicknesses were 9 to 10 and 1 to 3%, respectively. Anterior chamber angle and depth decreased slightly but significantly. Changes in the eyeball coats with fluid injections, indicate that the pressure vessel model can be applied to the eye to calculate corneal and scleral elasticities. (C) 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Biomedical Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Biomedical Sciences Research Institute
Biomedical Sciences Research Institute > Vision
ID Code:7612
Deposited By:Professor Barbara Pierscionek
Deposited On:18 Jan 2010 09:45
Last Modified:18 Jan 2010 09:45

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