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Photocatalytic inactivation of E. coli in surface water using immobilised nanoparticle TiO2 films

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Alrousan, DMA, Dunlop, PSM, McMurray, TA and Byrne, JA (2009) Photocatalytic inactivation of E. coli in surface water using immobilised nanoparticle TiO2 films. Water Research, 43 (1). p. 47. [Journal article]

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URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2008.10.015

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.watres.2008.10.015

Abstract

Photocatalysis is a promising method for the disinfection of potable water in developing countries where solar irradiation can be employed, thus reducing the cost of treatment. In addition to microbial contamination, water normally contains suspended solids, dissolved inorganic ions and organic compounds (mainly humic substances) which may affect the efficacy of solar photocatalysis. In this work the photocatalytic and photolytic inactivation rates of Escherichia coli using immobilised nanoparticle TiO2 films were found to be significantly lower in surface water samples in comparison to distilled water. The presence of nitrate and sulphate anions spiked into distilled water resulted in a decrease in the rate of photocatalytic disinfection. The presence of humic acid, at the concentration found in the surface water, was found to have a more pronounced affect, significantly decreasing the rate of disinfection. Adjusting the initial pH of the water did not markedly affect the photocatalytic disinfection rate, within the narrow range studied.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Computing & Engineering
Faculty of Computing & Engineering > School of Engineering
Research Institutes and Groups:Engineering Research Institute
Engineering Research Institute > Nanotechnology & Integrated BioEngineering Centre (NIBEC)
ID Code:7453
Deposited By:Dr Patrick Dunlop
Deposited On:18 Jan 2010 12:43
Last Modified:07 Apr 2014 11:57

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