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Culture and Caregivers: Factors Influencing Breastfeeding among Mothers in West Belfast, Northern Ireland

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Bishop, Hilary, Cousins, Wendy, Casson, Karen and Moore, Ann (2008) Culture and Caregivers: Factors Influencing Breastfeeding among Mothers in West Belfast, Northern Ireland. Child Care in Practice, 14 (2). 165 -179. [Journal article]

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URL: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a791510581~db=all

DOI: 10.1080/13575270701868785

Abstract

Breastfeeding is a key public health measure to protect and promote the health of one of the most vulnerable groups of the population—infants and children. Northern Ireland, however, has one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in the world. This paper reports the results of a questionnaire survey of 120 mothers attending mother and toddler groups in a socio-economically deprived area of Belfast Northern Ireland. Mothers' attitudes to breastfeeding were measured by the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale (IIFAS). In line with previous research, mothers who were older, had a husband or partner, who were of higher social class and who had themselves been breastfed as a child were more likely to breastfeed their own children. It was found that high scores on the IIFAS were significantly associated with breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding. However, of the 57% of study participants who reported that they had initiated breastfeeding, the majority (85.4%) reported that they had breastfed for less than the six months recommended by the World Health Organisation. Breastfeeding mothers reported that health benefits and information were the main reasons for their choice of feeding method and were more likely to rate information received from health professionals positively. Bottlefeeding mothers rated convenience, experience and “the norm” as the main reasons for choice of feeding and were more likely to rate information from health professionals negatively. The authors conclude that Northern Irish society needs to proactively encourage a positive breastfeeding culture and that the IIFAS may be useful in targeting interventions.

Item Type:Journal article
Keywords:Breastfeeding, Northern Ireland.
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Nursing
Research Institutes and Groups:Institute of Nursing and Health Research
Institute of Nursing and Health Research > Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Institute of Nursing and Health Research > Health Promotion and Adolescent Health
ID Code:6887
Deposited By:Dr Wendy Cousins
Deposited On:02 Feb 2010 16:37
Last Modified:05 Mar 2012 12:15

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