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Watercress supplementation in diet reduces lymphocyte DNA damage and alters blood antioxidant status in healthy adults

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Gill, Chris, Haldar, Sumanto, Boyd, Lindsay A., Bennett, Richard, Whiteford, Joy, Butler, Michelle, Pearson, Jenny R., Bradbury, Ian and Rowland, Ian R. (2007) Watercress supplementation in diet reduces lymphocyte DNA damage and alters blood antioxidant status in healthy adults. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, 85 (2). pp. 504-510. [Journal article]

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URL: http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/85/2/504

Abstract

Background: Cruciferous vegetable (CV) consumption is associated with a reduced risk of several cancers in epidemiologic studies. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of watercress (a CV) supplementation on biomarkers related to cancer risk in healthy adults. Design: A single-blind, randomized, crossover study was conducted in 30 men and 30 women (30 smokers and 30 nonsmokers) with a mean age of 33 y (range: 19-55 y). The subjects were fed 85 g raw watercress daily for 8 wk in addition to their habitual diet. The effect of supplementation was measured on a range of endpoints, including DNA damage in lymphocytes (with the comet assay), activity of detoxifying enzymes (glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase) in erythrocytes, plasma antioxidants (retinol, ascorbic acid, a-tocopherol, lutein, and beta-carotene), plasma total antioxidant status with the use of the ferric reducing ability of plasma assay, and plasma lipid profile. Results: Watercress supplementation (active compared with control phase) was associated with reductions in basal DNA damage (by 17%; P = 0.03), in basal plus oxidative purine DNA damage (by 23.9%; P = 0.002), and in basal DNA damage in response to ex vivo hydrogen peroxide challenge (by 9.4%; P = 0.07). Beneficial changes seen after watercress intervention were greater and more significant in smokers than in nonsmokers. Plasma lutein and P-carotene increased significantly by 100% and 33% (P < 0.001), respectively, after watercress supplementation. Conclusion: The results support the theory that consumption of watercress can be linked to a reduced risk of cancer via decreased damage to DNA and possible modulation of antioxidant status by increasing carotenoid concentrations.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Biomedical Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Biomedical Sciences Research Institute
Biomedical Sciences Research Institute > Northern Ireland Centre for Food and Health (NICHE)
ID Code:3744
Deposited By:Dr Chris Gill
Deposited On:17 Dec 2009 14:01
Last Modified:01 Nov 2011 12:43

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