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Low-temperature brewing using yeast immobilized on dried figs

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Bekatorou, A, Sarellas, A, Ternan, Nigel, Mallouchos, A, Komaitis, M, Koutinas, AA and Kanellaki, M (2002) Low-temperature brewing using yeast immobilized on dried figs. JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY, 50 (25). pp. 7249-7257. [Journal article]

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URL: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf020291q

DOI: 10.1021/jf020291q

Abstract

Dried figs, following exhaustive extraction of their residual sugars with water, were used for immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae AXAZ-1. The immobilized biocatalyst was used in repeated batch fermentations of glucose at 30 degreesC, where significant reduction of the fermentation time was observed, falling from 65 h in the first batch to 7 h after the sixth batch. Repeated fermentations of wort at room and low temperatures resulted in fermentation times that fell from 26 to 20 h and from 27 to 24 days at 18 and 3 degreesC, respectively. Ethanol and beer productivities were high, showing suitability of the biocatalyst for low-temperature brewing. Diacetyl concentrations were low (0.3-0.5 mg/L), and polyphenols were lower than in commercial products and decreased as the fermentation temperature was decreased (126-50 mg/L). Ethyl acetate concentrations increased from 53 to 88 mg/L as the temperature was decreased, while the concentration of amyl alcohols at 3 degreesC (58 mg/L) was lower than half of that at 18 degreesC (125 mg/L). The beers produced at the end of the main fermentation had a fine clarity and a special fruity figlike aroma and taste, distinct from commercial products and more intense than beers produced by cells immobilized on other food-grade supports (gluten pellets or delignified cellulosic materials). GC-MS analysis did not show significant differences in the qualitative composition of the aroma compounds of the beers produced by immobilized and free cells.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Biomedical Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Biomedical Sciences Research Institute
Biomedical Sciences Research Institute > Northern Ireland Centre for Food and Health (NICHE)
ID Code:3682
Deposited By:Dr Nigel Ternan
Deposited On:17 Dec 2009 13:36
Last Modified:16 May 2012 15:10

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