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Habitual fish consumption does not prevent a decrease in LCPUFA status in pregnant women (the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study)

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Bonham, M. P., Duffy, E. M., Wallace, Julie, Robson, P. J., Myers, G. J., Davidson, P. W., Clarkson, T. W., Shamlaye, C. F. and Strain, JJ (2008) Habitual fish consumption does not prevent a decrease in LCPUFA status in pregnant women (the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study). PROSTAGLANDINS LEUKOTRIENES AND ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS, 78 (6). pp. 343-350. [Journal article]

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DOI: 10.1016/j.plefa.2008.04.005

Abstract

Information on the status of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) in pregnancy and breast milk in very high fish-eating populations is limited. The aim of this study was to examine dietary intake and changes in fatty acid status in a population of pregnant women in the Republic of Seychelles. Serum docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) decreased significantly between 28-week gestation and delivery (n = 196). DHA status did not correlate significantly with length of gestation and was not associated with self-reported fish intake, which was high at 527 g/week. In breast milk, the ratio of DHA to arachidonic acid (AA) was consistent with those observed in other high fish-eating populations. Overall the data suggest that high exposure to LCPUFAs from habitual fish consumption does not prevent the documented decrease in LCPUFA status in pregnancy that occurs as a result of foetal accretion in the third trimester of pregnancy. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Biomedical Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Biomedical Sciences Research Institute
Biomedical Sciences Research Institute > Northern Ireland Centre for Food and Health (NICHE)
ID Code:3560
Deposited By:Dr Julie Wallace
Deposited On:15 Dec 2009 14:54
Last Modified:16 Jul 2012 16:27

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