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Comparative analysis of synovial fluid and plasma proteomes in juvenile arthritis – Proteomic patterns of joint inflammation in early stage disease

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Gibson, David, Blelock, Sarah, Curry, Jim, Finnegan, Sorcha, Healy, Adrienne, Scaife, Caitriona, McAllister, Catherine, Pennington, Stephen, Dunn, Michael and Rooney, Madeleine (2009) Comparative analysis of synovial fluid and plasma proteomes in juvenile arthritis – Proteomic patterns of joint inflammation in early stage disease. Journal of Proteomics, 72 . pp. 656-876. [Journal article]

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Abstract

Synovial fluid is a potential source of novel biomarkers for many arthritic disordersinvolving joint inflammation, including juvenile idiopathic arthritis. We first compared thedistinctive protein ‘fingerprints’ of local inflammation in synovial fluid with systemicprofiles within matched plasma samples. The synovial fluid proteome at the time of jointinflammation was then evaluated across clinical subgroups to identify early diseaseassociated proteins. We measured the synovial fluid and plasma proteomes using the two dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis approach. Image analysis software was used to highlight the expression levels of joint and subgroup associated proteins acrossthe study cohort (n=32). A defined subset of 30 proteins had statistically significantdifferences (p<0.05) between sample types such that synovial fluid could be differentiatedfrom plasma. Furthermore distinctive synovial proteome expression patterns segregatepatient subgroups. Protein expression patterns localized in the chronically inflamed jointtherefore have the potential to identify patients more likely to suffer disease which willspread from a single joint to multiple joints. The proteins identified could act as criteria toprevent disease extension by more aggressive therapeutic intervention directed at an earlierstage than is currently possible.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Biomedical Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Biomedical Sciences Research Institute
Biomedical Sciences Research Institute > Stratified Medicine
ID Code:23527
Deposited By:Dr David Gibson
Deposited On:08 Oct 2012 09:38
Last Modified:07 Apr 2014 12:05

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