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Fatigue and biocompatibility properties of a poly(methyl methacrylate) bonecement with multi-walled carbon nanotubes

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Ormsby, R, McNally, T, O'Hare, P, Burke, GA, Mitchell, C and Dunne, N (2011) Fatigue and biocompatibility properties of a poly(methyl methacrylate) bonecement with multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Acta Biomaterialia, 8 . pp. 1201-1212. [Journal article]

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URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2011.10.010

DOI: 10.1016/j.actbio.2011.10.010

Abstract

Composites of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) of varied functionality (unfunctionalised andcarboxyl and amine functionalised) with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) were prepared for use as a bone cement. The MWCNT loadings ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 wt.%. The fatigue properties of these MWCNT–PMMA bone cements were characterised at MWCNT loading levels of 0.1 and 0.25 wt.% with the type and wt.% loading of MWCNT used having a strong influence on the number of cycles to failure. The morphology and degree of dispersion of the MWCNT in the PMMA matrix at different length scales were examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy. Improvements in the fatigue properties were attributed to the MWCNT arresting/retarding crack propagation through the cement through a bridging effect and hindering crack propagation. MWCNT agglomerates were evident within the cement microstructure and the degree of agglomeration was dependent on the level of loading and functionality of the MWCNT. The biocompatibility of the MWCNT–PMMA cements at MWCNT loading levels up to 1.0 wt.% was determined by means of established biological cell culture assays using MG-63 cells. Cell attachment after 4 h was determined using the crystal violet staining assay. Cell viability was determined over 7 days in vitro using the standard colorimetric MTT assay. Confocal scanning laser microscopy and SEM analysis was also used to assess cell morphology on the various substrates.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Computing & Engineering
Faculty of Computing & Engineering > School of Engineering
Research Institutes and Groups:Engineering Research Institute
Engineering Research Institute > Nanotechnology & Integrated BioEngineering Centre (NIBEC)
ID Code:20908
Deposited By:Dr George Burke
Deposited On:02 Feb 2012 10:06
Last Modified:07 Apr 2014 10:47

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