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AN EVALUATION OF HYPERGLYCAEMIA MANAGEMENT IN STROKE CARE: IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Mitchell, Liz, Coates, Vivien, McCarron, Mark O, Ryan, Assumpta, Lyttle, Diane, Armstrong, Margaret and McCrum-Gardner, Evie (2011) AN EVALUATION OF HYPERGLYCAEMIA MANAGEMENT IN STROKE CARE: IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE. In: CARDI International Conference 2011, Dublin, Ireland. CARDI CONFERENCE. 1 pp. [Conference contribution]

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URL: http://www.cardi.ie/userfiles/Oral%20Presentations%20Abstracts.pdf

Abstract

Background: Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke. Up to one third of patients admitted to hospital with acute stroke have a history of diabetes mellitus. In addition, 58% of patients with no history of diabetes mellitus may meet the World Health Organisation criteria for diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance, if screened 12 weeks after stroke. Stroke clinical guidelines recommend that glycaemia is monitored and hyperglycaemia is treated. Methods: This was a retrospective medical records review of 112 patients consecutively admitted with acute stroke to the 3 district general hospitals in one Health and Social Care Trust in Northern Ireland between January 1 and April 15, 2008. Data were extracted between 1 November and 22 December 2009. The dynamic of glycaemia was explored. The extent to which glucose was monitored and clinicians intervened to treat glycaemic excursions was ascertained. Rates and methods of screening for undiagnosed diabetes mellitus were determined. Results: Forty one (36.6%) patients experienced glucose excursions ≥7.8mmol/l. in the first five days since hospital admission. Hyperglycaemia was a persisting trend, but was under monitored and undertreated. Laboratory glucose results that indicated hyperglycaemia among patients with no history of diabetes failed to influence higher rates of glucose monitoring or screening tests for diabetes. Conclusion: Hyperglycaemia is commonly observed in the acute phase of stroke, but glycaemia is under monitored and undertreated after stroke. Stroke clinicians could play a significant role in cardiovascular disease protection, by embracing enhanced monitoring and screening for undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes syndromes, and the initiation of treatment and health protection plans.

Item Type:Conference contribution (Paper)
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Nursing
Research Institutes and Groups:Institute of Nursing and Health Research
Institute of Nursing and Health Research > Managing Chronic Illness
Institute of Nursing and Health Research > Maternal, Fetal and Infant Research
Institute of Nursing and Health Research > Person-centred Practice
ID Code:20658
Deposited By:Ms Liz Laird
Deposited On:13 Feb 2012 15:54
Last Modified:17 Oct 2012 10:25

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