Ulster University Logo

Ulster Institutional Repository

Patterns of alcohol consumption and related behaviour in Great Britain: A latent class analysis of the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT)

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Smith, Gillian and Shevlin, Mark (2008) Patterns of alcohol consumption and related behaviour in Great Britain: A latent class analysis of the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT). ALCOHOL AND ALCOHOLISM, 43 (5). pp. 590-594. [Journal article]

Full text not available from this repository.

DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agn041

Abstract

Aims: Attempts have been made to develop typologies to classify different types of alcoholism. However, limited research has focused on classifications to describe general patterns of alcohol use in general population samples. Methods: Latent class analysis was used to create empirically derived behaviour clusters of alcohol consumption and related problems from the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) based on data from a large stratified multi-stage random sample of the population of Great Britain. Multinomial logistic regression was performed to describe these resultant classes using both demographic variables and mental health outcomes. Results: Six classes best described responses in the sample data. Three were heavy consumption groups, one with multiple negative consequences, one experiencing alcohol-related injury and social pressures to cut down and an additional class with memory loss. There was one moderate class with few negative consequences, and finally two mild consumption groups, one with alcohol-related injury and social pressure to cut down and one with no associated problems. Conclusions: Alcohol use in Great Britain can be hypothesized as reflecting six distinct classes, four of which follow a continuum of increased consumption leading to increased dependence and related problems and two that do not. Differences between alcohol use classes are apparent with reduced risk of depressive episode in moderate classes and an increased risk of anxiety disorders for the highest consumers of alcohol.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Psychology
Research Institutes and Groups:Psychology Research Institute
Psychology Research Institute > The Bamford Centre for Mental Health and Wellbeing
Psychology Research Institute > Health and Wellbeing
Psychology Research Institute > Psychological Epidemiology and Mental Health
ID Code:1991
Deposited By:Mrs Fiona Harkin
Deposited On:14 Dec 2009 14:53
Last Modified:15 Apr 2014 16:00

Repository Staff Only: item control page