Ulster University Logo

Ulster Institutional Repository

'The Theatrical Imagination of Arthur Rimbaud'

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Macklin, Gerald (1987) 'The Theatrical Imagination of Arthur Rimbaud'. FORUM FOR MODERN LANGUAGE STUDIES, XXIII (2). pp. 131-150. [Journal article]

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

This article explores the theatrical inspiration in Rimbaud's vision and expression. It argues that theatricality is intrinsic to Rimbaud's poetry and that it manifests itself in a host of ways throughout the canon. From characters to stage lighting, from musical and operatic elemnts to all types of performances, Rimbaud's work is replete with references to the stage world. A variety of critics have identified these elements but there has been no coherent, sustained analysis of the phenomenon. The article identifies the range of theatrical terminologuy in Rimbaud's work and then begins its detailed analysis by a consideration of Rimbaud's decors and mises en scène. From there we move to the function of colour and light which can be seen in 'Le Bateau ivre' and is such a feature of the Illuminations in poems like 'Métropolitain' and 'Aube'. Song and music also feature prominently and the piece examines Rimbaud's self -definition as an "opéra fabuleux". All of these elements at times fuse, especially in Rimbaud's poèmes-fête where he conjures up celebratory performances linked to epiphany as in 'Parade'. Rimbaud himself revels in a multiplicity of imaginative identities in his poetry and in the Illuminations he is the inventor, the child, the sage, the mystic, the musician tio name but a few of his preferred roles.This can be traced throughout his poetry as can his notion that the poem istelf becomes a performance. Again, it is in the Illuminations that this feature is most manifest through poems like 'Parade', 'Scènes' and 'Fairy'. We see poems as tales or prayers with irony and parody used in these instances; particularly arresting beginnings and finales; and a dynamic deployment of punctuation. The prose poems become special linguistic performances as Rimbaud lays on a poetic "parade" for his readers.

Item Type:Journal article
Keywords:theatricality; decor; lighting; music; performance
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Arts
Faculty of Arts > School of Modern Languages
Research Institutes and Groups:Arts and Humanities Research Institute
Arts and Humanities Research Institute > European Languages and Studies
ID Code:19286
Deposited By:Dr Gerald Macklin
Deposited On:30 Aug 2011 19:39
Last Modified:30 Aug 2011 19:39

Repository Staff Only: item control page