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Resource recovery and reduction of oily hazardous wastes via biosurfactant washing and bioremediation.

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Connolly, H. E., Pattanathu, K.S.M., Banat, Ibrahim and Lord, R. A. (2010) Resource recovery and reduction of oily hazardous wastes via biosurfactant washing and bioremediation. In: Trends in Bioremediation and Phytoremediation. Research Signpost, pp. 157-172. ISBN 978-81-308-0424-8 [Book section]

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Abstract

Physico-chemical washing of oil-contaminated soils with biosurfactant offers a novel pre-treatment method which could potentially enhance subsequent bioremediation. Although literature reviews and our pilot studies using artificially oil “spiked” soils under a similar washing regime had indicated that oil would be released during soil-washing, it was soon apparent that this was not the case for weathered, oil-contaminated waste soils where virtually no oil released into solution occurred. Furthermore, we frequently detected an apparent increase in soil hydrocarbon contamination levels in analysis after washing. This was demonstrated to be partly an artefact of the smaller grain size fraction used for the standard analytical protocol (<2 mm), compared to that used in the standard washing protocol (<4 mm). The apparent increased contamination in the former resulted from the efficient transfer of oil contamination from the coarser particles (i.e. 2-4 mm) to the clay component during soil-washing. We concluded that the envisaged combination of biosurfactant and low intensitysoil-washing was unlikely to remove oil from soils or other oily hazardous wastes due to the potent transfer of contaminants to the fine-grain fraction which is inherent in most conventional soil-washing processes. Biosurfactants however can potentially offer technically and economically competitive alternatives to chemical surfactants derived from fossil fuels.

Item Type:Book section
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Biomedical Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Biomedical Sciences Research Institute
Biomedical Sciences Research Institute > Pharmaceutical Science and Practice
ID Code:19003
Deposited By:Professor Ibrahim Banat
Deposited On:18 Jul 2011 15:32
Last Modified:16 May 2012 10:57

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