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Increasing-loudness aftereffect following decreasing-intensity adaptation: Spectral dependence in interotic and monotic testing

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Reinhardt-Rutland, Anthony (1998) Increasing-loudness aftereffect following decreasing-intensity adaptation: Spectral dependence in interotic and monotic testing. PERCEPTION, 27 (4). pp. 473-482. [Journal article]

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Abstract

Listening to decreasing intensity leads to illusory increasing loudness afterwards. Evidence suggests that this increasing-loudness aftereffect may have a sensory component concerned with dynamic localisation, This was tested by comparing the spectral dependence of monotic aftereffect (adapting and testing one ear) with the spectral dependence of interotic aftereffect (adapting one ear and testing the other ear). Existence of the proposed component implies that monotic aftereffect should be more spectrally dependent than interotic aftereffect. Three listeners were exposed to a 1 kHz adapting stimulus. From responses of ``growing softer'' or ``growing louder'' to test stimuli changing in intensity, nulls were calculated; test carrier frequencies ranged from 0.5 kHz to 2 kHz. Confirming the hypothesis, monotic aftereffect was about three times as strong as interotic aftereffect for the 1 kHz test carrier frequency, while monotic and interotic aftereffects were comparable in magnitude for test carrier frequencies below about 0.8 kHz and above about 1.2 kHz. The latter residual aftereffects are attributed to cognitive processing, perhaps concerning response bias. Sensitivity did not vary systematically across conditions; this is consistent with evidence that changing intensity entails mainly direct processing. The results cannot be attributed to the loudness adaptation elicited by steady stimuli.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Psychology
ID Code:1783
Deposited By:Mrs Fiona Harkin
Deposited On:23 Dec 2009 10:08
Last Modified:18 Apr 2011 16:25

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