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An application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour to blood donation: the importance of self-efficacy

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Giles, Melanie, McClenahan, Carol, Cairns, Ed and Mallett, John (2004) An application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour to blood donation: the importance of self-efficacy. HEALTH EDUCATION RESEARCH, 19 (4). pp. 380-391. [Journal article]

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DOI: 10.1093/her/cyg063

Abstract

Given that self-efficacy has emerged as a key construct in health psychology, this study set out to explore its utility in the context of blood donation as defined within the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). An Ajzen and Fishbein-type questionnaire was administered to 100 undergraduate students at the University of Ulster, Coleraine. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis provided strong support for the role of self-efficacy as a major determinant of intention. It not only helped to explain some 73% of the variance, but also made a greater contribution to the prediction of intention than the other main independent variables of the model-past behaviour and self-identity. Demonstrating the utility of self-efficacy in the context of blood donor behaviour not only has several important practical implications, but serves to further highlight its importance within the TPB.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Psychology
Research Institutes and Groups:Psychology Research Institute
Psychology Research Institute > Health and Wellbeing
Psychology Research Institute > Peace, Conflict & Equality
ID Code:1550
Deposited By:Mrs Fiona Harkin
Deposited On:23 Dec 2009 09:15
Last Modified:22 Jun 2011 14:57

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