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The distribution of positive psychosis-like symptoms in the population: A latent class analysis of the National Comorbidity Survey

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Shevlin, M, Murphy, Jamie, Dorahy, Martin J. and Adamson, Gary (2007) The distribution of positive psychosis-like symptoms in the population: A latent class analysis of the National Comorbidity Survey. SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, 89 (1-3). pp. 101-109. [Journal article]

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DOI: 10.1016/j.schres.2006.09.014

Abstract

Objective: Previous research has suggested that psychosis is better described as a continuum rather than a dichotomous entity. This study aimed to describe the distribution of positive psychosis-like symptoms in the general population by means of latent class analysis. Method: Latent class analysis was used to identify homogeneous sub-types of psychosis-like experiences. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to interpret the nature of the latent classes, or groups, by estimating the associations with demographic factors, clinical variables, and experiences of traumatic events. Results: The best fitting latent class model was a four-class solution: a psychosis class, a hallucinatory class, an intermediate class, and a normative class. The associations between the latent classes and the demographic risk factors, clinical variables, and experiences of traumatic events showed significantly higher risks for the psychosis class, the hallucinatory class, and the intermediate class compared to the normative class. Furthermore there appeared to be a grading in the magnitude of the odds ratios: the odds ratios for the psychosis group were generally higher than those for the hallucinatory class, and the odds ratios for the hallucinatory class were generally higher than those for the intermediate class. Conclusions: The latent class analysis showed that psychosis-like symptoms at the population level could be best explained by four groups that appeared to represent an underlying continuum. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Psychology
Research Institutes and Groups:Psychology Research Institute
Psychology Research Institute > Health and Wellbeing
ID Code:1517
Deposited By:Mrs Fiona Harkin
Deposited On:23 Dec 2009 09:09
Last Modified:12 Mar 2012 16:43

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