Ulster University Logo

Ulster Institutional Repository

Liquid Scintillation Spectrometry of 5-Fluorouracil in Cervical Tissue Following In-Vitro Surface Application of a Bioadhesive Cervical Patch

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Woolfson, A. D., McCafferty, D. F., McCarron, P. A. and Price, J. H. (1994) Liquid Scintillation Spectrometry of 5-Fluorouracil in Cervical Tissue Following In-Vitro Surface Application of a Bioadhesive Cervical Patch. Pharmaceutical research, 11 (9). pp. 1315-1319. [Journal article]

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

The potential use of bioadhesive technology for the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was investigated. A cervical patch was designed containing 5-fluorouracil in a bioadhesive matrix and polyvinyl chloride as the backing layer. The concentration of 5-fluorouracil at specified tissue depths from the cervical surface was determined in vitro in relation to the ability of the drug to reach precancerous foci in cervical crypts up to 4 mm below the tissue surface. Thus, tissue was exposed to drug-loaded patches spiked with 5-fluorouracil-6-H-3 and subsequently sectioned to obtain tissue slices at different depths. The concentration of 5-fluorouracil was determined by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Drug penetration into cervical tissue exceeded a depth of 5.5 mm. Furthermore, the concentration in the tissue depended on the drug loading in the patch. Patches containing 10 and 20 mg of 5-fluorouracil produced a linear drug gradient that was established after a 4 hour application of the patch and persisted over 24 hours. However, patches containing 3.5 mg of 5-fluorouracil displayed signs of drug exhaustion after 24 hours. The penetration characteristics of 5-fluorouracil through cervical tissue using the cervical patch delivery system were sufficiently favourable to warrant further clinical investigations.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science
ID Code:1188
Deposited By:Professor Paul McCarron
Deposited On:25 Nov 2009 16:42
Last Modified:29 Nov 2012 11:51

Repository Staff Only: item control page