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Effect of selenium status and supplementation with high-selenium yeast on plasma homocysteine and B vitamin concentrations in the UK elderly

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Bekaert, Bram, Cooper, Matthew L., Green, Fiona R., McNulty, Helene, Pentieva, Kristina, Scott, John M., Molloy, Anne M. and Rayman, Margaret P. (2008) Effect of selenium status and supplementation with high-selenium yeast on plasma homocysteine and B vitamin concentrations in the UK elderly. Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, 52 (11). pp. 1324-1333. [Journal article]

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DOI: 10.1002/mnfr.200700353

Abstract

The level of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy), long known to be B vitamin dependent, has recently been shown to be inversely associated with plasma selenium (Se) concentration in human subjects. We therefore, chose to investigate the interaction between Se, tHcy and B vitamins in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial where 501 healthy UK elderly volunteers were randomly allocated to receive 100, 200, or 300 lug Se/day as high-Se-yeast, or placebo-yeast for 6 months. Plasma Se, tHcy, folate, vitamin B-12, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) and its catabolite, 4-pyridoxic acid. were measured in all participants at baseline and in samples from the placebo, 100 and 300 mu g Se/day groups, at follow-up. At baseline, Se was inversely correlated with tHcy but only in males (p < 0.001). Before supplementation, tHcy concentration was significantly lower in the highest compared to the lowest Se tertile in males (p < 0.05), and in females when folate concentrations were also in the top tertile (p < 0.05). The effect of folate, PLP and vitamin B-12 concentrations on plasma tHcy correlated with Se concentration at baseline. After 6 months of Se supplementation, only Se concentration had changed significantly. Supplementation with Se does not affect tHcy concentration in the UK elderly population.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Biomedical Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Biomedical Sciences Research Institute
Biomedical Sciences Research Institute > Northern Ireland Centre for Food and Health (NICHE)
ID Code:11270
Deposited By:Dr Kristina Pentieva
Deposited On:04 Feb 2010 12:09
Last Modified:28 Aug 2012 10:32

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