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Role of sigma B factor in the alkaline tolerance response of Listeria monocytogenes 10403S and cross-protection against subsequent ethanol and osmotic stress

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Giotis, Efstathios S., Julotok, Mudcharee, Wilkinson, Brian J., Blair, Ian S. and McDowell, D.A. (2008) Role of sigma B factor in the alkaline tolerance response of Listeria monocytogenes 10403S and cross-protection against subsequent ethanol and osmotic stress. JOURNAL OF FOOD PROTECTION, 71 (7). pp. 1481-1485. [Journal article]

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Abstract

Many of the considerable abilities of Listeria monocytogenes to persist and grow in a wide range of adverse environmental conditions are thought to be at least partly under the control of the alternative sigma factor (sigma(B)), encoded by the sigB gene. However, little is known about the role of this master regulon in the impressive ability of Listeria to persist and grow under conditions of alkaline pH. In this study, Northern blot analysis of parent Listeria mRNA revealed that alkali adaptation (pH 9.5 for 1 h) significantly increased the expression of sigB-derived mRNA. The study included a comparison of the relative survival of mid-exponential populations of adapted and nonadapted parent type (sigma(B) expressing) and mutant (not (TB expressing, Delta sigB) Listeria strains during subsequent alkaline (pH 12.0), osmotic (25% NaCl, wt/vol), or ethanol (16.5%) stress. Alkali-adapted parent strains were more resistant to pH 12.0 than were adapted Delta sigB type strains, but both alkali-adapted parent and Delta sigB strains were more resistant to pH 12.0 than were nonadapted strains. Alkali-adapted parent strains were more resistant to osmotic stress than were adapted Delta sigB type strains. No significant differences in viability were observed between alkali-adapted parent and Delta sigB strains after ethanol stress, suggesting that cross-protection against osmotic stress is mediated by sigma(B) whereas cross-protection against ethanol is sigma(B) independent. Overall, alkali-induced cross-protection against osmotic and ethanol challenges may have serious implications for food safety and human health because such stress conditions are routinely used as part of food preservation and surface cleaning processes.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Biomedical Sciences Research Institute
Biomedical Sciences Research Institute > Infection and Immunity/Microbiology
ID Code:10975
Deposited By:Professor David McDowell
Deposited On:30 Jan 2010 17:35
Last Modified:12 Mar 2013 14:04

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