Ulster University Logo

Ulster Institutional Repository

Assessment of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-3 concentrations in male and female multiple sclerosis patients and control volunteers

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Lowe-Strong, Andrea (2007) Assessment of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-3 concentrations in male and female multiple sclerosis patients and control volunteers. Multiple Sclerosis, 13 (5). pp. 670-672. [Journal article]

Full text not available from this repository.

DOI: 10.1177/1352458506072666

Abstract

Populations with insufficient ultraviolet exposure and who consume diets low in vitamin D have low vitamin D status (plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations) and a reported higher incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS). The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-3 (1,25(OH)(2)D-3), is an effective anti-inflammatory molecule. No research to date has assessed 1,25(OH)2D3 concentrations in individuals with MS. In this study, plasma concentrations of 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)(2)D-3 and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were measured in 29 individuals with MS and 22 age- and sex-matched control volunteers. There were no significant differences in plasma PTH, 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D3 concentrations between individuals with MS and control volunteers. Women with MS had significantly higher 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D3 concentrations than men with MS (79.1 +/- 45.4 versus 50.2 +/- 15.3nmol/L, P=0.019 and 103.8 +/- 36.8 versus 70.4 +/- 28.7pmol/L, P=0.019, respectively). There was a significant positive correlation between 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)(2)D-3 concentrations in all subjects (r=0.564, P=0.000), but secondary analysis revealed that the correlation was driven by women with MS (r=0.677, P=0.001). Significant sex differences in vitamin D metabolism were observed and were most marked in individuals with MS ' suggesting that vitamin D requirements may differ between the sexes, as well as by underlying disease state.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Research Institutes and Groups:Institute of Nursing and Health Research > Centre for Health and Rehabilitation Technologies
ID Code:10207
Deposited By:Dr Andrea Lowe-Strong
Deposited On:29 Jan 2010 12:12
Last Modified:28 Feb 2012 16:29

Repository Staff Only: item control page