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Intergroup contact, friendship quality and political attitudes in integrated and segregated schools in Northern Ireland

Biomedical Sciences Research Institute Computer Science Research Institute Environmental Sciences Research Institute Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials Research Institute

Stringer, Maurice, Irwing, P., Giles, Melanie, McClenahan, Carol, Wilson, R. and Hunter, J. A. (2009) Intergroup contact, friendship quality and political attitudes in integrated and segregated schools in Northern Ireland. BRITISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, 79 (Part 2). pp. 239-257. [Journal article]

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URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bpsoc/bjep/2009/00000079/00000002/art00003?token=005310336b64277b6876275024552b3568793c462375677e442f20675d5866344444497b6d784051ea2

DOI: 10.1348/978185408X368878

Abstract

Background. This study examines the effects of integrated and segregated schooling on Northern Irish children's self-reported contact and friendship with members of the other denominational group in school and community settings. Aim. To assess the effects of cross group friendships and cross group contacts in school and outside school on children's political attitudes. Sample. A cross-sectional design was employed with 1732 children being assessed at three age levels 11,12 & 14 years in eight-matched integrated, maintained (Catholic) and controlled (Protestant) schools. Method. Lisrel modelling was used to investigate the interrelationships among cross group friendship quality, cross group contacts in school and outside school and children's political attitudes. Results. Intergroup contact within and outside school was reported frequently in integrated schools but only occasionally in segregated schools. Modelling revealed that cross group contacts in school and outside school were both associated with less extreme political attitudes. Friendship quality with cross group members had no significant effects on political attitudes. Conclusions. The results provide support for educating Protestants and Catholics together as a means of moderating attitudes and creating cross-community friendships in a divided society.

Item Type:Journal article
Faculties and Schools:Faculty of Life and Health Sciences
Faculty of Life and Health Sciences > School of Psychology
Research Institutes and Groups:Psychology Research Institute
Psychology Research Institute > Health and Wellbeing
Psychology Research Institute > Peace, Conflict & Equality
ID Code:1002
Deposited By:Mrs Fiona Harkin
Deposited On:07 Dec 2009 16:26
Last Modified:15 Jun 2011 11:11

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